February 01, 2013 | Updated: January 29, 2019

By Ramonica Jones


       Central Texas area athlete, Vanessa Hargis, gets examined and fitted for a new pair of glasses and sports goggles       

When you're a basketball and bowling athlete, like Vanessa Hargis of Austin, there are two things you never want to be without: game and good vision.  Volunteers and physicians are participating at Winter Games to help our competitors out with the vision part.  On Friday, competitors took a break from their hectic schedules to stop by Opening Eyes for a vision exam and a fitting for eyeglasses.

Dr. Sylvian Ung of Texan Eye explained, "We're seeing a lot of nearsightedness, which is pretty common in this demographic. The [eye] pressure is good for many of the athletes." Poor pressure is often a sign of glaucoma.

Students from the University of Houston College of Optometry volunteered at Opening Eyes this year. They helped athletes find that perfect pair of glasses, goggles, and even sunglasses.

"UV protection is so important," said Dr. Ung.  "We're also testing color vision, depth perception and checking pupils", since pupils that are unequal may be a sign of a neurological issue.

It'll take about three weeks for athletes to receive their new glasses.  If you missed out on Opening Eyes today, be sure to stop by for an exam on Saturday anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at the Norris Conference Center.

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