SOTX Announces 2016 Athletes and Coach of the Year Honorees

Award recipients will be honored at Fall Classic in Bryan/College Station on Oct. 14.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Sept. 27, 2016 

 

AUSTIN – Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) officially announced its 2016 statewide Athletes and Coach of the Year award winners on Tuesday.  Brendan West (Pasadena) and Kylie Tyson (Canyon) were named Male and Female Athlete of the Year, respectively, for the 15-21 age range, while Kyle Eddlemon (Missouri City) and Julia Kilgore (Wichita Falls) were tabbed with the same respective honors for the 22+ age group. Clara Edwards (Monahans) was recognized as the organization’s Coach of the Year. 

West has been participating with SOTX for the last 10 years. He got involved through his middle school where he participated on the Deer Park ISD team. Since then “Bebo,” how West is known to friends and family, has continued to play Bocce, Basketball, Bowling and Soccer. This remarkable list of sports is even more impressive due to the fact that West is in a wheelchair and has no arms. He was born with a rare syndrome that causes limbs not to form or develop and intellectual disabilities, but he hasn’t let that hold him back. 

Tyson got involved with SOTX in 2003 and has been very active since participating. Over the years, she has participated in Aquatics, Athletics, Basketball and Bowling. SOTX has helped her make many new friends and she has become a mentor and positive reinforcement for some of the younger athletes. Earlier this year, Tyson was named the Panhandle area’s Female Athlete of the Year. She also had the opportunity to participate in the Penn Relays in Philadelphia as part of the 4X100 meter women’s Unified Relay team. 

Eddlemon has been competing in SOTX sports since 1994. Over the last 22 years, he has competed in Softball, Basketball and Volleyball. Outside of SOTX, Eddlemon works for the Houston Astros’ Major League Field Operations and the University of Houston baseball team. He is also involved with The Arc of Fort Bend County, the largest national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. He assists The Arc in their fundraising efforts by acquiring Astros memorabilia for a silent auction. Eddlemon is living his sports dream, working for the Astros and University of Houston and competing with Special Olympics Texas. 

Kilgore has been involved with SOTX since 1998. To date, she competes in Aquatics, Basketball, Bocce, Bowling and Track and Field with SOTX. Her coach, Crysti Ruth, says she has substantially grown as an athlete and a leader. Besides staying active as a SOTX athlete, Kilgore volunteers for the non-profit Meals on Wheels and participates with The ARC.  

At 87-years old, Edwards is still coaching SOTX athletes. She got involved with SOTX in 1986 and since then has served the organization in many capacities in the Permian Basin/Big Bend area. Edwards is dedicated to every athlete she coaches. She will stay at an event until every athlete has been picked up, or she will give them a ride home herself. Edwards continues supporting children’s activities through her church and community as well as being a SOTX coach at a time when most adults would be retired.

The five recipients will be formally recognized at an awards ceremony on Friday, Oct. 14 in Bryan/College Station during the 2016 SOTX Fall Classic competition. 

 

2016 Special Olympics Texas Athlete and Coach of the Year Awards 

Name

Category

City

Kylie Tyson

Female Athlete of the Year: 15-21

Canyon

Kyle Eddlemon

Male Athlete of the Year: 22+

Missouri City

Clara Edwards

Coach of the Year

Monahans

Brendan West

Male Athlete of the Year: 15-21

Pasadena

Julia Kilgore

Female Athlete of the Year: 22+

Wichita Falls

 

 

 

  




About Special Olympics Texas

Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) is a privately funded non-profit organization that changes lives through the power of sport by encouraging and empowering people with intellectual disabilities, promoting acceptance for all, and fostering communities of understanding and respect. SOTX provides continuing opportunities for more than 55,200 children and adults with intellectual disabilities throughout the Lone Star State to realize their potential, develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience joy and friendship. To learn more, visit www.specialolympicstexas.org or call 800.876.5646. Engage with us on: Twitter @SOTexas; fb.com/SpecialOlympicsTX; youtube.com/specialolympicstexas.


MEDIA CONTACT:
Steve Helm – Public Relations Coordinator, Special Olympics Texas
800.876.5646, ext. 2925 (office); 267.421.3911 (cell – media only); shelm@sotx.org


About Special Olympics Texas
Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) is a privately funded non-profit organization that changes lives through the power of sport by encouraging and empowering people with intellectual disabilities, promoting acceptance for all, and fostering communities of understanding and respect.  SOTX provides continuing opportunities for more than 58,800 children and adults with intellectual disabilities throughout the Lone Star State to realize their potential, develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience joy and friendship.  To learn more, visit www.specialolympicstexas.org or call 800.876.5646.  Engage with us on: Twitter @SOTexas; fb.com/SpecialOlympicsTX; youtube.com/specialolympicstexas.